5 Beauty Tips For Teenage Girls: Fact Verses Fiction

Posted on September 25, 2017 in Uncategorized

Some of the popular beauty tips for teenage girls are not based on any factual evidence but rather hearsay passed down from one generation to another. Often it is the mothers of teenage girls who feel that they are compelled to share beauty secrets with their young female offspring. Unfortunately some of these so-called beauty tips for teenage girls being shared by well-meaning moms are not based on any facts and in some cases may actually cause more harm than good. In this article we will take a look at some of these more popular time-tested beauty tips and tell you whether or not each is based more on fact than fiction.

Beauty Tip #1: Fact or Fiction? Daily Hair Brushing For Healthy Hair

Have you been told that to have healthy hair you need to brush your hair vigorously, at least 100 strokes of the brush, at least once every day? This beauty tip was generally accepted as being true until very recently. Probably because any excessive brushing of the hair will stimulate the production of natural oils in the scalp leaving the hair looking shiny and healthy. Recent studies have shown that this type of excess hair brushing not only causes you to have a very oily scalp leading to plugged hair pores to hinder hair growth plus the action of the brushing alone can weaken hair follicles and enhance the chances of hair breakage. So the smart conclusion seems to be that this is one of those beauty tips for teenage girls which can actually cause more harm than good. Final verdict: Fiction

Beauty Tip #2: Fact or Fiction? Too Much Sitting Causes Varicose Veins

Have you ever seen someone with dark blue veins running like a spider web up and down their legs and feet? If so, then you have seen what are called varicose veins. One of the often shared beauty tips for teenage girls states that these nasty looking veins are caused by sitting too much. In this case, we are dealing with a fact. Varicose veins are brought about by poor blood circulation which often happens when you are sitting for extended periods of time, and also if you happen to be standing in a certain spot for a long time. To help avoid varicose veins it is very important to be moving your body and stretching so that there is good blood circulation throughout your body, especially in the legs and feet. So avoid any situation where you are required to sit or stand for long periods of time and instead try to get up and walk around or if standing, then move from one spot to another to keep that blood flowing.

Beauty Tip #3: Fact or Fiction? Trim Your Hair Makes It Grow Faster

Of all the beauty tips for girls that we are going to look at, this may be one of the most common. Many girls will argue that this really works. Sadly you have cut your hair for nothing, as this does not work and is therefore fiction. Normal hair only grows at an average of one half an inch each month with any excess growth happening only during the summer months. Trimming your hair will not change this growth cycle of the hair and cause it to grow any faster. In fact the hair trimming is doing just the opposite, as once trimmed, instead of having the longer hair you are seeking in reality you now have shorter hair!

Beauty Tip #4: Fact or Fiction? Toothpaste Is An Acne Cure

If you are like many teenage girls and struggle to deal with facial acne, your parent or someone else may have suggested the use of toothpaste as an acne cure for your face. Not only is this a fictional beauty tip for teenage girls, but is one beauty tip that may make your acne problem even worse. The fact is that toothpaste does nothing to help cure your facial acne problem and if this is not bad enough, the chemicals contained in the toothpaste may actually promote even more acne and in some cases even lead to scarring. So again, avoid the use of toothpaste and seek professional advice from a dermatologist about what products are safe and effective to use for your acne problem. After all, it is called toothpaste for a reason!

Beauty Tip #5: Fact or Fiction? A Great Tan Equals Great Health

For many years both adults and teens believed that having a great suntan made you look healthy. Sadly there are still many people who believe this and even products being marketed that will try to fool you into thinking that excessive tanning is good for you. In fact there is lots of research that proves without a doubt that the idea of having a suntan to appear more healthy is false. Concentrated sun exposure often leads to skin cancers, some of which can be fatal to the victim. Recently even tanning beds have been shown to promote skin cancers in some users and there is a growing public demand for restrictions on who can visit sun tanning salons, much like regulating the sale of liquor. Obviously we all like to go outside, especially on a hot sunny day. No one is saying that you can not ever go outside or even go to the beach on a hot day. Rather you have to be much more careful now than in the past due to the harsher rays of the sun. Apply sun protection lotions prior to going outside and if you are planning to spend an extended amount of time in the sun, then use at least sun screen with a SPF rating of 30. Don’t forget to wear a hat to prevent a sun burn on your scalp and wear light clothing to help protect sensitive body parts such as your legs and arms should the lotion wear off. Many of you reading this may find that this is the most difficult one of the beauty tips to accept since we have all been subjected to so many advertisements over the years telling us how attractive looking a sun tan will make you look to the opposite sex.

I hope that these beauty tips for teenage girls discussed in this article will help you stay healthy and avoid some of the dangers associated with blindly believing things that are simply not true when we look at how to be beautiful.

Sex Educaton for Teens

Posted on September 23, 2017 in Uncategorized

Talking about sex with your teenage daughter or son is difficult already however it is also difficult and uneasy for them to hear it from their parents. Most teens don’t want to face the fact that their parents actually do have sex and that is how they were brought about! Now of course they know how they were brought into this world but they don’t want to hear all the horrid stories about the so called “birds and the bees” story as you don’t feel comfortable talking to them about it. If you talk to them from the time they are little about anything and everything and you have given them the comfort of knowing there is no closed door on any subject they will feel a sense of comfort and know your care and concern. It’s that open door policy that I use with my children. My daughter knew what a tampon was at the age of 4 however she didn’t know all of the details but she knew it was for ladies to use for one week out of the month called our “lady time” and I see nothing wrong with making her aware of what it was called without sugar coating it or lying to her or saying nothing.

Sex educating our teens is a very important conversation that I feel is very much needed in depth with them and not just about pregnancy. Yes, pregnancy does occur however it’s not the only discussion that should be talked about. This is why giving them the accessibility of condoms is a very good idea. That way they can be protected at all times. When a girl starts her menstrual cycle it’s probably a good idea to get her regulated on birth control pills if she is into having sex. Sex education for teens is a very important thing for teens these days to hear.

HIV is one of the most deadly diseases of all that a person can get from being sexually active. Do you know how many partners has the person you are sleeping with has slept with? The reason for the question is because you are sleeping with every person he/she has slept with and vice versa. You don’t know all of the sexual history that a person has and they don’t know that about you either and it becomes a viscous cycle. You can and should get tested every 6 months because as previously stated it is a silent killer and sometimes goes undetected without proper testing and it could become too late and you don’t want that to happen.

As one parent to the next I suggest that you discuss every angle there is about educating your teen about sex education for teens. If you are a little nervous about it you can read some books on how to talk to them to break the ice and not sound so scared or make them so vulnerable or afraid or embarrassed when doing so. You can go to your local library and read up on some books that can help you better talk to them on their level but also as a parent. I know for me there was a cute book all about sex education for teens that I read and I’m sorry I can’t recall the name but there are some good one’s out there that you can get to help you level with your teen. It is very important to be able to have that line of communication open because when they do have (and they will) sex for the first time (if still under your roof) you will want them to come to you for advice or help. You need to prepare them with all the tools to keep them safe. Make sure they have condoms in their wallet and purses and make sure they have money to call home with if they need you or their cell phones are charged when they leave out on a date. Just be there for them, sometimes they just want someone to listen. Don’t pry they will come to you if you make them realize that line of communication is open and just be prepared because it’s never easy. Just know that you have given them all the information and tools needed to help them make the right decision when it comes to sex education for teens!

[Top]

Sex Ed: For Parents or Students (Preteens or Teens)?

Posted on September 21, 2017 in Uncategorized

Sex is a delicate topic, regardless of who is talking about it. When sex and children are mentioned in the same breath, the subject becomes even more sensitive. From Abstinence Only to Comprehensive Sex Education, the subject matter encompasses various meanings and belief systems attached to the concept, depending on one’s community, upbringing, school system, government, and many more variables.

While many towns and cities around the country debate on how and if Sex Education should be handled IN the school, WHO needs it becomes an interesting issue. This past summer, in fact, a college student posed the following idea: PARENTS today need Sex Ed. We’ve been quite focused on Sex Ed for preteen and teen students, that perhaps, we’ve forgotten about others who may need Sex Ed too. We have to ask the question: do parents need Sex Education more than teens and preteens do?

I speak with many parents as I travel around the world, and my experiences usually end up supporting the hypothesis above. It seems like many parents today, do indeed need Sex Education. Why do I say this?

1) Many parents are naive when it comes to dating and sexual activity among their pre-teen and teenager sons and daughters. Parents constantly share how everyone wants to believe, “Not my child,” and avoid the subject of Sex Ed.

2) For parents who want to discuss Sex Ed at home, the biggest issue is usually how they don’t know HOW to talk about the issue – besides trying to “scare” their child away from intimacy. The intentions are there, but many parents simply aren’t equipped to tackle Sex Ed on their own.

3) Many parents are also unaware of sexual fads among school age children. Whenever this comes up, many Moms and Dads will give a bewildered look and say “I’m 45 years old and have never tried that, and never would.” What they don’t know, or perhaps, what they implicitly accept, is that their children may sometimes be thinking and acting beyond what they, as parents, can imagine.

What do you think? Do you think that today’s parents need Sex Education? If so, what do you think parents need to learn and/or discover?

Some argue that Sex Education “is a subject which should be taught at home.” Do you agree? Is home the ONLY right place for teaching “Sex Ed”? Would teaching both AT HOME and AT SCHOOL be more effective, or less?

Do most parents at home have the right information for teaching the subject matter? If you think parents do need Sex Education, how would you recommend providing the education? More importantly, how do you convince parents to actually attend SexEd classes?

[Top]